no LNG

What is LNG and why do we oppose it?

Liquefied Natural Gas is predominantly methane (CH4) that has been converted to liquid form for ease of stroage or transport. It takes us 1/600th the volume of natural gas in gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive.

The liquification process involves removal of certain components such as dust, acid gases, helium, water, and heavy hydrocarbons. The natural gas is then condensed into a liquid at close to atmospheric pressure by cooling it to -162 degrees C (-260F).

-One risk of the liquification process is a rapid phase transition explosion (RPT), which occurs when cold LNG comes into contact with water. In other words, LNG explodes when it touches water!

stopthepipe(web)

What would the pipeline and export terminal look like?

Jordan Cove LNG will export Liquid Natural Gas from “abundant” Canadian and US Rockies natural gas supply sources, primarily through existing pipeline and gas gathering network. This terminal with would transport 1.2 billion cubic feet of gas per day from Klamath Falls to Coos Bay.

There are multiple projects involved to complete this terminal.

Proposed facilities:

-marine facilities: Single LNG Marine Berth, dedicated Tractor Tug dock

-Jordan Cove plans to dredge some 2.3 million cubic yards of material for its shipping berth on the Coos Bay channel, and use the spoils to build up massive earthen berms to elevate the liquefaction and power plants out of the tsunami inundation zone.

-Two LNG storage tanks with capacity of 320,000 m3

-Gas treating facilities

-a 420 MW natural gas-fired combined cycle power plant to power the liquification process

-The Pacific Connector Gas pipeline: a proposed 232 mile, 36-inch diameter pipeline. It is equally owned by Veresen and a subsidiary of the Williams Companies, INC.

– The pipeline route crosses five major rivers: the Coos, Coquille, Rogue, South Umpqua, and Klamath rivers and over 400 streams. The Pipeline would cross land owned by the state, the federal government, and private individuals creating a 95 foot permanent clearcut. About 300-675 private landowners, would be compensated by the pipeline company for the use of their land, with prices set either through negotiation or via the legal process of eminent domain seizure. The cost to construct the pipeline was estimated at $1.5 billion.

Where would the pipeline run?

The 230-mile, 36-inch high pressured gas pipeline would originate at the proposed Jordan Cove LNG terminal in Coos Bay/North Bend, then cross through Coos, Douglas, Jackson and Klamath Counties, ending at Malin, Oregon.

LNG-2

The Jordan Cove worker camp:

The Jordan Cove Worker Camp has proposed to add some 2,100 additional people to the City of North Bend, which amounts to a more than 20% increase in the current total population of the City of approximately 9,545 residents.

The Worker Camp permit had committed the City of North Bend to pay for two thirds of the cost of upgrading a $350,000 pump station necessary to facilitate the camp.

The proposed Worker Camp permit had also incorporated the Simpson and Ferry Road Parks

What companies are involved in the project?

Veresen (Calgary, Alberta, Canada) – part owner, leading investor on terminal project

Williams Companies Inc (Tulsa, Oklahoma) – part owner of pipeline project

PG&E (Portland and vancouver) – part owner of pipeline project

Black & Vaetch (vancouver office) – lead Engineering, Construction and procurement company and liquifaction technology provider.

Kiewit (Omaha, Nebraska) – responsible for construction of the facilities

VINCI Energies Group & Entrepose Contracting (multinational) – LNG tank construction

Baker Botts LLP (Houston, Texas) – commercial legal representation

Dickstein Shapiro (Washington DC) – federal permitting

Perkins Coie (Seatle, Washington) – local and state permitting

What regulatory bodies are involved in this project?

Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC)

U.S. Department of Transportation

U.S. Corp of Engineers

U.S. Maritime Administration

U.S. Coast Guard

Oregon Department of Environmental Quality

Oregon Department of Energy

The state of Oregon will process applications for use of state lands, impacts to waterbodies, and the dredging proposal at Coos Bay. The U.S. Forest Service, BLM, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries all have a role to play in granting, or denying, permits.

How are private landowners impacted?

About 675 private landowners, would be compensated by the pipeline company for the use of their land, with prices set either through negotiation or via the legal process of eminent domain seizure. The landowners would lose access and endure limitations on that right-of-way such as: an inability to plant crops with deep roots, lack of access with heavy equipment, and a clearing of all brush and trees. A majority of impacted landowners are opposed to the project. Landowners would have to endure long term devaluation of their properties and ongoing environmental degradation in exchange for a one time payout. The pipeline corridor will also create throughway for the spread of invasive species in Southern Oregon. The pipeline would cross approximately 150 miles of private lands.

What grassroots organizations are working on resisting this project?

-Cascadia Forest Defenders

-Coast Range Forest Watch

-Citizens Against LNG

-KS wild

-Rouge River Keepers

-Sarah Westover

-OWL (Francis’ land)

-350

What other DA or grassroots groups are opposing similar projects (LNG terminals)?

Cove point: a group in Massachusetts resisting an LNG export terminal on the east coast.

Portland Rising Tide

Citizens against LNG

The Environmental Defence Center has information about the defeated LNG proposals in California

What are some important dates

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has issued a revised schedule for the environmental review of the Jordan Cove liquefied natural gas (LNG) export terminal and Pacific Connector Gas Pipeline. The final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will now be issued on Sept. 30, 2015 rather than the previous date of June 12, 2015.

History of LNG in Oregon:

Since the 1970s, plans to construct liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals in California have been defeated one after another. As a result, multi-national energy interests turned their sights south to Mexico and north to Oregon. In 2008, the Costa Azul LNG terminal in Baja, Mexico, became the first LNG facility to be completed on the West Coast of North America, and until recently, there were three proposals for massive LNG terminals in Oregon. One proposal for LNG in Oregon failed when the company declared bankruptcy in 2010 and two proposals now remain in Oregon: one at the mouth of the Columbia River and the other in Coos Bay. Either project would be the first LNG import facility constructed on the West Coast of the continental United States, furthering our nation’s reliance on imported fossil fuels.

Jordan Cove is a proposal to export up to one billion cubic feet of fracked gas per day from Coos Bay. This would require extensive construction of a new 420 megawatt power plant used solely to liquefy the gas for transport on tankers, an extensive network of gas storage tanks, and a massive shipping terminal within the tsunami zone on the north spit of Coos Bay. The Pacific Connector pipeline that Jordan Cove wants to build to supply this terminal with would transport 1.2 billion cubic feet of gas per day from Klamath Falls to Coos Bay, using gas supplied from the interior west and Canada. This new pipeline would cross 230 miles of public and private land.

Contribution to the issue of Climate Change

 Refrigeration, venting, leaks, and flaring make LNG 30 percent more energy intensive than conventional natural gas. The carbon footprint of LNG is at least as bad as coal, if not worse.

Public Health impacts

According to the EPA long and short-term exposures to fine particle pollution, also known as fine particulate matter can cause premature death and harmful effects on the cardiovascular system, including increased hospital admissions and emergency department visits for heart attacks and strokes. Scientific evidence also links PM to harmful respiratory effects, including asthma attacks.

Along with many other chemicals released in LNG processing, Ozone can increase the frequency of asthma attacks, cause shortness of breath, aggravate lung disease and cause permanent damage to lungs through long-term exposure. Carbon monoxide and other greenhouse gas pollution leads to more frequent and intense heat waves that increase mortality, especially among the poor and elderly. As well as increased production or dispersion of airborne allergens. Benzene and formaldehyde are two of the biggest cancer risk drivers.

How are endangered species impacted?

The project would impact twenty-nine federally endangered or threatened species, including Coho salmon, marbled murrelet, northern spotted owl, six species of whale and four species sea turtle. Extensive dredging for terminal construction in the Coos Bay estuary would have an enormous impact on sensitive estuarine habitats and marine species: the amount of material that would be dredged out of the estuary would fill the Rose Bowl stadium in Pasadena nearly 14 times.

How are public lands impacted?

Approximately 80 miles of the pipeline would cross public land on the Rogue River/Siskiyou, Umpqua and Winema/Fremont National Forests as well as the Medford and Coos Bay Districts of the BLM. The pipeline would create a linear 95-foot wide clearcut, and in doing so, would degrade and fragment forest habitat for endangered species, increase erosion, cut forests in old-growth reserves and in and riparian reserves and open up a highway for invasive species and ORV use.

The Forest Plans for all three National Forests and the BLM currently do not allow such harm to our public resources for pipeline construction. As a result, the Forest Service and BLM have begun a process to amend their Forest Plans to allow for pipeline development. We are engaged in the process for Forest Service and BLM plan amendments.

How are private landowners impacted?

Approximately 150 miles of the 230-mile pipeline would be on private property. Over 300 private landowners are threatened with the use of eminent domain for the pipeline right-of-way. Landowners would likely receive a small one-time payment for the pipeline running across their property, while they would lose access and endure limitations on that right-of-way such as: an inability to plant crops with deep roots, lack of access with heavy equipment, and a clearing of all brush and trees. A majority of impacted landowners are opposed to the project.

Who authorizes this project?

This is a complicated question because there are a lot of permits the companies have to acquire at federal, state, and county levels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has already given Jordan Cove LNG a certificate, however that is being challenged by a coalition of groups and individuals, including the state of Oregon. The state of Oregon will process applications for use of state lands, impacts to waterbodies, and the dredging proposal at Coos Bay. The U.S. Forest Service, BLM, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and NOAA Fisheries all have a role to play in granting, or denying, permits.

 

Feel free to contact the companies and policy makers involved in the Jordan Cove Project, below are some easy contacts.

Marketing / Commercial Contact:
Vern Wadey
Vice President Jordan Cove LNG
Veresen Inc.
Phone: 403-213-3639
Email: jordancove@vereseninc.com

Head Office Veresen Inc.

Suite 900, Livingston Place, South Tower

222 – 3rd Avenue S.W. Calgary, Alberta

T2P 0B4 Phone: 1-403-296-0140 Fax: 1-403-213-3648

Corporate Communications & Investor Relations Veresen Inc.
Phone: 1-403-213-3633
Fax: 1-403-213-3648
Email: investor-relations@vereseninc.com

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